Breakfast Cereals Highest in Fiber—A Survey of 62 Brands


The Cereal Aisle

Only 6% of Americans are getting enough fiber every day, according to the USDA1. Breakfast cereal is a great way to increase your fiber intake. I surveyed 62 brands of widely available cold cereal brands and compared their fiber content, and did the math to adjust for the varying serving sizes (see table below).

I also provide a list of high fiber cereals with soluble and insoluble fiber information broken out, and what these terms mean.

I also explain what fiber is and how to increase it in your diet. But first, drumroll please…

The Top 10 Highest-Fiber Breakfast Cereal Brands

Here is the list; details follow. The full table of 62 brands is further below.

  1. Poop Like a Champion (Updraft Ventures), 48g
  2. All-Bran Buds (Kellogg’s), 34g
  3. Fiber One (General Mills), 27g
  4. Smart Bran (Nature’s Path), 23g
  5. All-Bran Original (Kellogg’s), 18g
  6. Grape Nuts (Post), 14g
  7. Ezekiel 4:9—Golden Flax (tie with High Fiber), 14g
  8. High Fiber, (tie with Ezekiel 4:9—Golden Flax), 14g
  9. Uncle Sam, 13g
  10. Ezekiel 4:9—Original, 12g

#1: Poop Like A Champion

Poop Like a Champion Box
Poop Like a Champion in a Bowl

The cereal highest in fiber by far of all 62 brands I analyzed is Poop Like a Champion, by Updraft Ventures. Champion is the champ. It has 48 grams of dietary fiber per 1 cup serving size, which is 166% of the US RDA (Recommended Daily Value) for fiber for adults. The cereal was created with fiber benefits in mind, per its to-the-point but unappetizing brand name. Poop Like a Champion has 41% more fiber than the second-highest-fiber cereal, All-Bran Buds.

The ingredients in Poop Like a Champion are: Corn Bran, Whole Grain Sorghum, Ground Psyllium Fiber, Inulin, Corn Starch, Sugar, Baking Soda, Sea Salt.

Note that psyllium fiber is the same ingredient in Metamucil, the fiber supplement. You could eat a different cereal and sprinkle Metamucil on it for a similar nutrient profile. Inulin is also available as a supplement. Both of these ingredients are added to many food brands to increase fiber content. Inulin is also a prebiotic and supports your good gut bacteria. It is relatively low in sugar compared to most of the cereals on this list and does not add vitamins as ingredients.

I like that most of the ingredients are real foods and there are no preservatives or “sprayed-on” vitamins. Corn starch is there as a thickener and is found in many home pantries. Sorghum is a healthful grain that is not often found in other foods, but is worth seeking out.

Poop Like a Champion is expensive at $13.97 per box. But if nothing else works for you, you may find it well worth it. You can buy Poop Like a Champion here at Amazon (get a discount for buying in “bulk,” ha!).

#2. All-Bran Buds

All-Bran Buds Box

All-Bran Buds (Kellogg’s) has the second-highest amount of fiber among all cereals tested at 34 grams per serving, which is 122% of the DV. All-Bran Buds should not be confused with All-Bran Original, which is the 5th highest-fiber cereal, and is also by Kellogg’s.

The Ingredients in All-Brand Buds are: Wheat Bran, Sugar, Malt Flavor, Contains 2% Or Less Of Salt. Vitamins And Minerals: Niacinamide, Reduced Iron, Vitamin B6 (Pyridoxine Hydrochloride), Vitamin B2 (Riboflavin), Vitamin B1 (Thiamin Hydrochloride), Folic Acid, Vitamin D3, Vitamin B12.

I like All-Bran Bud’s relatively simple ingredients, though I am not a fan of added sugar. Note that malt flavor is also a sweetener. And the added vitamins are unnecessary unless you are deficient in these nutrients. Taking your vitamins separately as supplements gives you more control over the type and quantity of vitamins you are getting.

Also note: this is the exact same list of ingredients as All-Bran Original, #5 on the list. This brand simply has a higher proportion of fiber (or wheat bran, one can assume).

It will be cheaper at your local grocery store, but if you have trouble finding All-Bran Buds, Amazon has it here and you can get a discount for buying a multi-pack.

#3. Fiber One

Fiber One Box

The third-highest-fiber cereal is Fiber One, by General Mills. Fiber One has 27 grams of fiber per serving, which at 93% of the DV is almost an entire day’s worth of fiber.

The ingredients in Fiber One are: Whole Grain Wheat, Corn Bran, Modified Wheat Starch, Color (caramel color and annatto extract), Guar Gum, Cellulose Gum, Salt, Baking Soda, Sucralose, Natural Flavor. Vitamins and Minerals: Calcium Carbonate, Vitamin C (sodium ascorbate), Iron and Zinc (mineral nutrients), A B Vitamin (niacinamide), Vitamin B6 (pyridoxine hydrochloride), Vitamin B1 (thiamin mononitrate), Vitamin B2 (riboflavin), A B Vitamin (folic acid), Vitamin B12.

Fiber One boasts of 0g of sugar on the front of its box. That’s because it is sweetened with sucralose, an artificial sweetener. So avoid this one if you are avoiding artificial sweeteners. It also contains the thickening, stabilizing agents guar gum and cellulose gum, which are beneficial to the manufacturing process—not your health or taste buds. To be fair, guar gum also adds fiber, but there are many other cereal choices that offer high fiber from whole ingredients.

I also don’t love to see natural flavor as a food ingredient because there is no FDA oversight as to what this is. It can be any flavoring that originated from a plant or animal, but it can be highly processed and contain many chemical additives and GMO ingredients. See this article at PureFood.com (no affiliation) on why I avoid “natural flavor.” Fiber One is the only cereal in the top ten that has it. Note that natural flavorings may not be vegan, either.

Again it’s cheaper at your grocery store, but Amazon has Fiber One here.

#4. Smart Bran

Smart Bran box

The fourth-highest-fiber cereal is Smart Bran, by Nature’s Path. Smart Bran has 23 grams of fiber, which is 79% of your DV.

The ingredients in Smart Bran are: Wheat bran*, oat fiber*, cane sugar*, psyllium seed husk*, barley malt extract*, oat bran*, whole oat flour*, sea salt. *Organic. 

I like the lack of artificial or mystery ingredients in Smart Bran, and that all ingredients are organic. And there are no “sprayed-on” vitamins. But sugar is pretty high up on the list of ingredients, and barley malt extract is also a sweetener.

The best value is at your grocery store, but you can also get Smart Bran here at Amazon.

#5. All-Bran Original

All-Brand Original Box

The fifth-highest fiber cereal is All-Bran Original, by Kellogg’s. Don’t confuse it with the #2 cereal, All-Bran Buds, also by Kellogg’s. All-Bran Original has 18 grams of fiber, representing 62% of your DV.

The ingredients in All-Bran Original are: Wheat bran, sugar, malt flavor, contains 2% or less of salt. Vitamins and Minerals: Niacinamide, reduced iron, vitamin B6 (pyridoxine hydrochloride), vitamin B2 (riboflavin), vitamin B1 (thiamin hydrochloride), folic acid, vitamin D3, vitamin B12.

These are the exact same ingredients as the other All-Bran Buds, but Buds has almost twice the fiber. The Buds version must have a higher proportion of wheat bran. If you like this cereal, pick one of the two brands based on how much you want to maximize your fiber intake.

I appreciate the simple ingredients, with the exception of the artificially added vitamins. And I prefer my cereals with little to no added sugar. Keep in mind malt flavor is also a sweetener.

All-Bran Original is available on Amazon here.

#6. Grape-Nuts

Grape Nuts Box

Grape-Nuts is the sixth-highest-fiber cereal (by Post). Grape-Nuts has 14 grams of fiber, which is 54% of your DV.

The ingredients in Grape-Nuts are: Whole grain wheat flour, malted barley flour, salt, dried yeast. Vitamins and Minerals: Reduced iron, niacinamide (vitamin B3), zinc oxide (source of zinc), pyridoxine hydrochloride (vitamin B6), thiamin mononitrate (vitamin B1), folic acid.

I’m impressed Grape-Nuts is able to provide such a high amount of fiber with its relatively simple, natural ingredients. And I like that it has no added sugar (malted barley flour adds some sweetness). I’m not a fan of added vitamins, but if you aren’t taking these vitamins separately as supplements, they won’t do you any harm. I also prefer that grains be in their original form, versus ground into a flour and then extruded—see why in my exposé on cereal manufacturing, here.

Get a discounted pack of four boxes of Grape-Nuts at Amazon here.

#7. Ezekiel 4:9—Golden Flax

Ezekiel 4:9—Golden Flax Box

The seventh-highest fiber cereal is Ezekiel 4:9—Golden Flax variety, by Food For Life. It has 14 grams of fiber and meets 48% of your DV. It is tied with High Fiber by Trader Joe’s, see #8 (I put them in alphabetical order).

The ingredients in Ezekiel 4:9—Golden Flax are: Organic Sprouted Wheat, Organic Golden Flax Seeds, Organic Sprouted Barley, Organic Sprouted Millet, Organic Sprouted Lentils, Organic Sprouted Soybeans, Organic Malted Barley, Organic Sprouted Spelt, Filtered Water, Sea Salt, Organic Rosemary Extract.

I am a huge fan of this cereal. For fiber, it’s in the top 10. It’s actually tied with #6, Grape-Nuts, in grams of fiber, but due to rounding, comes out lower in % DV. It has no added sugar, though the Malted Barley adds sweetness. All the major ingredients are organic. Its grains are sprouted, which increases nutritional value2. I also love how the cereal is not made with flour—again, see why in my other article on cereal, here. I also find it delicious. It has a similar taste and texture as Grape-Nuts.

For all these reasons, this is my #1 recommended cereal, for its fiber and other healthful benefits (and lack of unhealthful ingredients).

Ezekiel 4:9—Golden Flax can be expensive, but Amazon has a good deal on a pack of six here.

#8. High Fiber

High Fiber Box

The eighth-highest fiber cereal is Higher Fiber by Trader Joe’s. This straightforwardly-named brand offers 14 grams of fiber, which is 48% of your DV. This puts it at a tie with #7, Ezekiel 4:9—Golden Flax.

The ingredients in High Fiber are: Wheat Bran, Corn Flour, Corn Bran, Dehydrated Cane Juice Crystals (Natural Milled Suger), Whole Wheat Flour, Oat Bran, Whey (Milk), Salt, Caramel Color. Vitamins and Iron: Vitamin C, Iron, Niacin, Vitamin A, Vitamin B6, Riboflavin (Vitamin B2), Thiamin (Vitamin B1), Folic Acid, Vitamin D.

While the fiber is high, and the ingredients are real food, for the most part, they aren’t organic, and there is added sugar (dehydrated cane juice crystals). High Fiber has 5 grams of sugar to Ezekiel 4:9 Golden Flax’s 1 gram of sugar, which has the same fiber amount. Caramel Color is there for aesthetics, not your palate or health, and the high nutritional content is due to added vitamins, not the inherent food value.

Trader Joe’s will be a better value, but Amazon carries High Fiber here.

#9. Uncle Sam

Uncle Sam Box

Uncle Sam is the ninth-highest-fiber cereal. This brand is owned by Three Sisters, a division of Post Cereals. Uncle Sam provides 13 grams of fiber, which is 45% of your DV.

The ingredients in Uncle Sam are: Whole grain wheat, flax seed, barley malt, salt.

I love the short, simple list of real-food ingredients. The fiber is inherent in the primary ingredients, not added. There are no added vitamins (I prefer to get mine from food or supplements of my choosing). And like Ezekiel, this cereal is not made from a flour slurry; the grain is rolled whole and then toasted. Again, read more about why this is important in my article here.

For all these reasons, Uncle Sam is my third-most recommended cereal after the two Ezekiel varieties (#7 Golden Flax and #10 Original).

Uncle Sam can be a little hard to find sometimes, but Amazon carries it at a discount for a two-pack here.

#10. Ezekiel 4:9—Original

Ezekiel 4:9 Original Box

The tenth highest-fiber cereal is Ezekiel 4:9—Original, by Food For Life. It has 12 grams of fiber which is 41% of your DV. This is a different variety of #7, with similar ingredients, but 2 grams less of fiber, likely due to the lack of flax that is found in the Golden Flax variety.

The ingredients in Ezekiel 4:9—Original are: Organic Sprouted Wheat, Organic Sprouted Barley, Organic Sprouted Millet, Organic Sprouted Lentils, Organic Sprouted Soybeans, Organic Malted Barley, Organic Sprouted Spelt, Filtered Water, Sea Salt, Organic Rosemary Extract.

As I detailed for #7, I also recommend this cereal for all the same reasons. But #7 is my preferred, due to the addition of Flax and its slightly higher fiber content.

Find Ezekiel 4:9—Original on Amazon here.

The Lowest Fiber Cereals

I didn’t analyze cereals that aren’t created with health in mind, like Lucky Charms, with its marshmallow ingredients, or Reece’s cereal, based on candy. All the cereals in my list are marketed as healthy. All the cereals in my list are marketed as healthy. Among these relatively healthy contenders, here are the worst cereals in terms of fiber.

The lowest-fiber cereal of the 62 reviewed is Special K, which has negligible fiber. Not surprising, given its top three ingredients are rice, wheat gluten, and sugar.

The second-lowest fiber cereal is Smart Start, with 2 grams of fiber, representing 7% of your DV. This brand is not so smart a choice if you are looking for a high fiber, low sugar cereal (rice, whole grain wheat, and sugar are the top three ingredients).

What is the Definition of “High Fiber?”

According to the Whole Grains Council3, a food is high in fiber if it contains 5 grams or more of fiber per serving. By that definition, the top 53 cereals in the table below are all high in fiber. However, with fiber content in the group varying from 5 grams to 48 grams, there is a wide range to choose from. Because most Americans don’t get enough fiber, I recommend choosing one of the top 20 brands in the table, which would give you at minimum a third of your daily fiber requirement if you eat one cup of cereal.

Recommendations

For all the reasons discussed above, my top recommendation for a high fiber cereal, even though it is not #1 in fiber, is Ezekiel 4:9—Golden Flax.

Nutrition experts say it is best to get fiber from whole foods, versus fiber additives. There are other nutrients in whole foods that may help substances like inulin work better versus when it is added as an isolated ingredient. If you can’t or won’t eat naturally high-fiber foods like whole grains, fruits and vegetables, then an ultra-high fiber cereal like Poop Like a Champion could be helpful.

“Poop” is so high in fiber that it may cause digestive issues in some people. Start by eating a small amount and see how your body reacts. You can increase the portion size gradually over time as your body adjusts.

All-Bran Buds and Smart Bran get their fiber boost from psyllium. Psyllium is made from the husks of the Plantago ovata plant’s seeds. It is used as a laxative in products like Metamucil.

Fiber One relies on whole grain wheat and corn bran for its fiber, but it has sucralose as its sweetener (hence the “0g of added sugar” on the front of the box). All-Bran, the 5th highest-fiber cereal on the list, gets its fiber from wheat bran. Along with All-Bran, most of the rest of the cereals on the list get their fiber from grain sources rather than psyllium or inulin.

I am a huge fan of the Ezekiel, Uncle Sam, and Alpen cereals on this list. You can read more about why in my other article on the 13 healthiest breakfast cereals, here. These three brands are all among the top 12 highest-fiber cereals and get their fiber from whole grains versus psyllium husks or inulin. Again psyllium and inulin aren’t bad for you. But I believe that whole foods are better for you. Have a bowl of Ezekiel cereal and a glass of Metamucil, if you really want to add more concentrated fiber to your diet (or if your doctor tells you to).

Cold Breakfast Cereal Brands in Order From Highest Fiber to Lowest (Adjusted for Serving Size)

Cereal Brand and Manufacturer
(Calculated for 1 cup serving size)


Total Dietary Fiber
(grams)
%DV*
1.Poop Like A Champion (Updraft Ventures)48166
2.All-Bran Buds (Kellogg’s)34122
3.Fiber One (General Mills)2793
4.Smart Bran (Nature’s Path)2379
5.All-Bran Original (Kellogg’s)1862
6.Grape-Nuts (Post)1454
7.Ezekiel 4:9—Golden Flax (Food For Life) (tied with High Fiber)1448
8. High Fiber (Trader Joe’s) (tied with Ezekiel 4:9—Golden Flax)1448
9.Uncle Sam (Three Sisters/Post Holdings)1345
10.Ezekiel 4:9—Original (Food For Life)1241
11.Ezekiel 4:9—Almond (Food For Life)1241
12Alpen Muesli Triple Berry (Three Sisters/Post Holdings)1138
13.Hearty Morning Fiber (Cascadian Farm)1036
14.Alpen Muesli No Suger Added (Three Sisters/Post Holdings)1034
15.Go (Kashi)1034
16.Alpen Muesli Original (Three Sisters/Post Holdings)931
17.Cracklin’ Oat Bran (Kellogg’s)931
18.Ezekiel 4:9—Flax + Chia Flourless Flakes (Food For Life)931
19.Ezekiel 4:9—Original Flourless Flakes (Food For Life)931
20.Chex—Wheat (General Mills)829
21.Raisin Bran (Market Pantry/Target brand)828
22.Raisin Bran (Kellogg’s)726
23.Bran Flakes (Great Value/Walmart brand)725
24.Great Grains Banana Nut Crunch (Post)725
25.Raisin Nut Bran (General Mills)725
26.Bran Flakes (Post)724
27.Great Grains Crunchy Pecan (Post)724
28.Great Grains Raisins, Dates and Pecans (Post)724
29.Raisin Bran (Post)724
30.All Bran Complete (Kellogg’s)622
31.Oatmeal Crisp (General Mills)622
32.Raisin Bran (Cascadian Farms)621
33.Shredded Wheat (Barbara’s/Post Holdings)621
34.Shredded Wheat Original Spoon Size (Post)621
35.Shredded Wheat Original Big Biscuit (Post)621
36.Shredded Wheat Wheat ‘N Bran (Post)621
37.Great Grains Cranberry Almond Nut Crunch (Post)519
38.Basic 4 (General Mills)518
39.Cinnamon Raisin Bran—Organic Crunchy (Barbara’s/Post Holdings)518
40.Multigrain Spoonfuls (Barbara’s/Post Holdings)518
41.Frosted Mini-Wheats—Original (Kellogg’s)517
42.Grape-Nuts Flakes (Post)517
43.Morning Oat Crunch (Barbara’s/Post Holdings)517
44.Oatmeal Squares—Cinnamon (Quaker)517
45.Weetabix (Three Sisters/Post Holdings)517
46.Wheaties (General Mills)517
47.Oatmeal Squares—Honey Nut (Quaker)516
48.Raisin Bran Crunch (Kellogg’s)416
49.Oatmeal Squares—Brown Sugar (Quaker)415
50.Puffin’s Multigrain (Barbara’s/Post Holdings)414
51.Spelt Flakes (Arrowhead)414
52.Total (General Mills)414
53.Great Grains Blueberry Morning (Post)413
54.Special K—Cinnamon Pecan (Kellogg’s)312
55.Amaranth Flakes (Arrowhead)310
56.Life (Quaker)310
57.Cheerios (General Mills)310
58.Cheerios—Multi-Grain (General Mills)27
59.Chex-Corn (General Mills)27
60.Chex-Rice (General Mills)27
61.Smart Start (Kellogg’s)27
62.Special K—Original (Kellogg’s)<10-2

* Based on USDA food labels guidance of 29 grams for adults. Some percentages in the table vary for the same grams of fiber due to rounding.

Cold Breakfast Cereal Brands in Alphabetical Order (Adjusted for Serving Size)

The fiber numbers won’t match what you see on the boxes in some cases, as I’ve calculated the numbers based on 1 cup for each cereal, to create a consistent basis for comparison.

Cereal Brand and Manufacturer
(Calculated for 1 cup serving size)


Total Dietary Fiber
(grams)
%DV*
All-Bran Original (Kellogg’s)1862
All-Bran Buds (Kellogg’s)34122
All-Bran Complete (Kellogg’s)611
Alpen Muesli No Suger Added (Three Sisters/Post Holdings)1034
Alpen Muesli Original (Three Sisters/Post Holdings)931
Alpen Muesli Triple Berry (Three Sisters/Post Holdings)1138
Amaranth Flakes (Arrowhead)310
Basic 4 (General Mills)518
Bran Flakes (Great Value/Walmart brand)725
Bran Flakes (Post)724
Cheerios (General Mills)310
Cheerios—Multi-Grain (General Mills)27
Chex-Corn (General Mills)27
Chex-Rice (General Mills)27
Chex—Wheat (General Mills)829
Cinnamon Raisin Bran—Organic Crunchy (Barbara’s/Post Holdings)518
Cracklin’ Oat Bran (Kellogg’s)931
Ezekiel 4:9—Almond (Food For Life)1241
Ezekiel 4:9—Flax + Chia Flourless Flakes (Food For Life)931
Ezekiel 4:9—Golden Flax (Food For Life)1448
Ezekiel 4:9—Original (Food For Life)1241
Ezekiel 4:9—Original Flourless Flakes (Food For Life)931
Fiber One (General Mills)2793
Frosted Mini-Wheats—Original (Kellogg’s)517
Go (Kashi)1034
Grape-Nuts (Post)1454
Grape-Nuts Flakes (Post)517
Great Grains Banana Nut Crunch (Post)725
Great Grains Blueberry Morning (Post)413
Great Grains Cranberry Almond Nut Crunch (Post)519
Great Grains Crunchy Pecan (Post)724
Great Grains Raisins, Dates and Pecans (Post)724
Hearty Morning Fiber (Cascadian Farm)1036
High Fiber (Trader Joe’s)1448
Life (Quaker)310
Morning Oat Crunch (Barbara’s/Post Holdings)517
Multigrain Spoonfuls (Barbara’s/Post Holdings)518
Oatmeal Crisp (General Mills)622
Oatmeal Squares—Cinnamon (Quaker)517
Oatmeal Squares—Brown Sugar (Quaker)415
Oatmeal Squares—Honey Nut (Quaker)516
Poop Like a Champion (Poop Like A Champion)48166
Puffin’s Multigrain (Barbara’s/Post Holdings)414
Raisin Bran (Kellogg’s)726
Raisin Bran (Market Pantry/Target brand)828
Raisin Bran (Post)724
Raisin Bran (Cascadian Farms)621
Raisin Bran Crunch (Kellogg’s)416
Raisin Nut Bran (General Mills)725
Shredded Wheat (Barbara’s/Post Holdings)621
Shredded Wheat Original Spoon Size (Post)621
Shredded Wheat Original Big Biscuit (Post)621
Shredded Wheat Wheat ‘N Bran (Post)621
Smart Bran (Nature’s Path)2379
Smart Start (Kellogg’s)27
Special K—Original (Kellogg’s)<10-2
Special K—Cinnamon Pecan (Kellogg’s)312
Spelt Flakes (Arrowhead)414
Total (General Mills)414
Uncle Sam (Three Sisters/Post Holdings)1345
Weetabix (Three Sisters/Post Holdings)517
Wheaties (General Mills)517

* Based on USDA food labels guidance of 29 grams for adults. Some percentages in the table vary for the same grams of fiber due to rounding.

Soluble and Insoluble Fiber

Of the 62 brands I assessed, 32 provide a breakdown of their fiber into soluble and insoluble amounts. This information is listed below, in alphabetical order by brand, adjusted for a consistent serving size of one cup.

Both soluble and insoluble fiber are good for you and offer different benefits.

Soluble fiber dissolves in fluid and creates a gel-like substance in your digestive system and feeds your good gut bacteria. It also may lower cholesterol, prevent fat absorption and provide other health benefits. Insoluble fiber absorbs water and leads to softer, bulkier, more regular stools. It passes through your body without being absorbed, so it doesn’t add calories.

Both types offer many other health benefits. There is no right or wrong answer to how each cereal breaks down its fiber across the two types. But here is the data, for your information.

Cereal Brand and Manufacturer
(Calculated for 1 cup serving size)
Soluble Fiber
(grams)
Insoluble Fiber
(grams)
Total Dietary Fiber
(grams)
All-Bran (Kellogg’s)51419
All-Bran Buds (Kellogg’s)102434
Alpen Muesli No Suger Added (Three Sisters/Post Holdings)5611
Alpen Muesli Original (Three Sisters/Post Holdings)369
Alpen Muesli Triple Berry (Three Sisters/Post Holdings)3710
Bran Flakes (Great Value/Walmart brand)<157
Bran Flakes (Post)<167
Cheerios (General Mills)224
Cinnamon Raisin Bran—Organic Crunchy (Barbara’s/Post Holdings)134
Fiber One (General Mills)22628
Frosted Mini-Wheats—Original (Kellogg’s)<144-5
Go (Kashi)<188-9
Grape Nuts (Post)21215
Grape Nuts Flakes (Post)<145
Great Grains Banana Nut Crunch (Post)257
High Fiber (Trader Joe’s)21214
Morning Oat Crunch (Barbara’s/Post Holdings)224
Multigrain Spoonfuls (Barbara’s/Post Holdings)235
Oatmeal Crisp (General Mills)246
Oatmeal Squares—Cinnamon (Quaker)235
Oatmeal Squares—Brown Sugar (Quaker)224
Oatmeal Squares—Honey Nut (Quaker)235
Poop Like a Champion (Poop Like A Champion)123648
Puffin’s Multigrain (Barbara’s/Post Holdings)224
Raisin Bran (Market Pantry/Target brand)538
Raisin Bran (Post)<166-7
Shredded Wheat (Barbara’s/Post Holdings)<155-6
Shredded Wheat Original Spoon Size (Post)<155-6
Shredded Wheat Original Big Biscuit (Post)<155-6
Shredded Wheat Wheat ‘N Bran (Post)<155-6
Uncle Sam (Three Sisters/Post Holdings)4913
Weetabix (Three Sisters/Post Holdings)235

Why Eat Cereal Fiber if You Eat a Lot of Fruit and Veggies?

Studies show that the fiber from whole grains may have different benefits from the fiber in fruit and vegetables, including:4,5,6

  • Reduces inflammation
  • Improves cardiovascular disease
  • Reduces osteoarthritis joint pain
  • Lowers risk of diabetes

To be sure, veggies and fruit are incredibly healthy, and they are great sources of gut-friendy fiber and pre-biotics. My point is not to say don’t eat fruit and veggies for their fiber—but add high fiber whole grains to your diet for maximum health.

And even within the world of whole grains, all fiber isn’t the same. The Whole Grains Council says, “From the soluble beta-glucan fiber in barley and oats, to the hemicellulose fiber in wheat, to the pectin in buckwheat, whole grains provide countless opportunities to nurture your health and keep your gut microbiome happy and healthy.”3

How to Comfortably Increase Your Fiber

  1. Go slow. If you aren’t accustomed to a high fiber diet, start with small amounts, and gradually increase your intake over time. Suddenly increasing fiber can cause cramping, bloating and constipation.
  2. Be patient. Any uncomfortable effects will diminish over time as your body adjusts.
  3. Drink a lot of water. Water helps you process fiber, and combines with soluble fiber to create a gel that slows your digestion, and makes you feel full.

Summing it Up

You may also be interested in my article on the healthiest breakfast cereals—see the winner here.

What vegetable has the most fiber? Find out the surprising answer here.

What fruit has the highest fiber? Get the list here.

Resources

All nutrition data for products came from the product packaging.

1 USDA Survey: https://www.ars.usda.gov/ARSUserFiles/80400530/pdf/usual/Usual_Intake_gender_WWEIA_2015_2018.pdf.

2 Benincasa, P., Falcinelli, B., Lutts, S., Stagnari, F., & Galieni, A. (2019). Sprouted Grains: A Comprehensive Review. Nutrients11(2), 421. https://doi.org/10.3390/nu11020421.

3 https://wholegrainscouncil.org/blog/2022/04/why-not-all-fiber-created-equal.

4 Shivakoti, R., Biggs, M. L., Djoussé, L., Durda, P. J., Kizer, J. R., Psaty, B., Reiner, A. P., Tracy, R. P., Siscovick, D., & Mukamal, K. J. (2022). Intake and Sources of Dietary Fiber, Inflammation, and Cardiovascular Disease in Older US Adults. JAMA network open5(3), e225012.

5 Dai Z, Niu J, Zhang Y, et alDietary intake of fibre and risk of knee osteoarthritis in two US prospective cohorts. Annals of the Rheumatic Diseases 2017;76:1411-1419.

6 Schulze, M. B., Schulz, M., Heidemann, C., Schienkiewitz, A., Hoffmann, K., & Boeing, H. (2007). Fiber and magnesium intake and incidence of type 2 diabetes: a prospective study and meta-analysis. Archives of internal medicine167(9), 956–965. https://doi.org/10.1001/archinte.167.9.956.

Vicki Spellman

Vicki Spellman is a certified Holistic Nutritionist (AFPA) and Senior VP at a large healthcare communications firm.

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